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How Dopkins Wealth's fixed income offering is different

Posted by The Dopkins Wealth Team

Jan 26, 2016 8:00:00 PM

Dopkins Wealth Management is a member of the BAM Alliance, a community of more than 140 independent wealth management firms located throughout the United States — united in belief and in practice that there is a better, more effective, and more resilient way for investors and their families to safeguard their financial futures and realize their dreams.  Our clients benefit in many ways through this alliance, including many fixed income advantages. The following outlines some of these benefits to fixed income investors.  

Dopkins, through the BAM Alliance, works with BAM’s Fixed Income department, a team of dedicated fixed income advisors who help provide customized investment solutions for Dopkins’ clients. BAM’s Fixed Income Desk evaluates new assets and portfolios, constructs bond ladders and monitors bond positions for credit quality changes. The desk manages more than $8 billion in bonds and bond funds and trades $2 billion in market value a year. We want to share some key differentiators between Dopkins and BAM’s Fixed Income offering compared with the traditional broker-dealer model.

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Topics: fixed income, bonds, municipal bonds, registered investment advisor, ria, investment advisors act



5 Ways We Evaluate Muni Bonds

Posted by The Dopkins Wealth Team

Nov 19, 2015 3:51:06 PM

While there have been few defaults in the municipal market, it’s important to note that not all muni bonds are created equal. The market offers many different types of bonds backed by varying legal pledges and revenue sources to repay the debt. The following are some of the qualifications it takes for a muni offering to meet our strict parameters to be considered for purchase.

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Topics: fixed income, bonds, muni bonds, municpal bonds



A bond’s coupon rate vs. yield to maturity— know the difference?

Posted by The Dopkins Wealth Team

Jun 8, 2015 2:00:00 PM

The coupon rate tells you the annual amount of interest paid by a fixed income security. For example, a Treasury bond with a coupon rate of 5 percent will pay you $50 per year per $1,000 of face value of the bond. The coupon rate, however, tells you very little about the yield. For most securities, the yield is a good proxy for the return of the fixed income security (that is, how much you can expect your wealth to increase if you purchase the security) and is far more meaningful than the coupon rate. To illustrate, consider these two Treasury bonds:

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Topics: fixed income, bonds, dwm, bonds; fixed income, securities



The new issue vs. secondary municipal bond market

Posted by The Dopkins Wealth Team

Apr 27, 2015 2:30:11 PM

A: Essentially, there is little difference between the two markets. Their structure is identical in terms of credit quality, revenue source, price and yield. The new issue realm is the initial offering of a security, similar to an initial public offering in the equity market. However, the volatility that is sometimes associated with an equity IPO does not exist in the high-grade new issue municipal market. The new issue market is simply the means by which a municipality raises cash by issuing debt. The only material discrepancy between the two markets is that newly issued municipal bonds typically have an extended settlement date of 1-2 weeks, as opposed to T+3 (investing shorthand for trade date plus three days).

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Topics: bonds, muni bonds, municpal bonds, new issue muni bond, secondary muni bond



Bond ladder: What it is and what you should know about them

Posted by The Dopkins Wealth Team

Nov 20, 2014 10:31:10 AM

Bond ladder defined

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Topics: bonds, investing in bonds, dopkins wealth management, investment strategy, investments, securities



What are TIPS and how do they work?

Posted by The Dopkins Wealth Team

Nov 14, 2014 12:03:36 PM

Similar to nominal (non-inflation-adjusted) U.S. Treasury fixed income investments, TIPS (Treasury Inflation Protected Securities) are issued with fixed coupon rates and fixed maturity dates (such as five, 10 or 20 years). The key difference between TIPS and nominal bonds is that the coupon rate for TIPS is a guaranteed “real” (inflation-adjusted) return. The principal is adjusted for inflation before the interest payment is calculated. With TIPS, the coupon payments and face value will maintain purchasing power until maturity.

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Topics: fixed income, bonds, bonds; fixed income



Callable Bonds: What are they and what are their risks and returns?

Posted by The Dopkins Wealth Team

Oct 30, 2014 12:37:09 PM

Q: What are callable bonds? And what are the risk and return of callable bonds?

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Topics: fixed income, bonds, municipal bonds, muni bonds, investing in bonds, investment strategy



Bonds: Stay invested short term while waiting for interest rates?

Posted by The Dopkins Wealth Team

Oct 15, 2014 10:14:22 AM

Q: Should you stay invested in the short term while waiting for interest rates to rise?

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Topics: fixed income, bonds, investing in bonds, investment strategy, investments



Wondering about the benefits of buying higher coupon bonds?

Posted by The Dopkins Wealth Team

Jun 9, 2014 12:21:03 PM

Q:   What are the benefits of buying higher coupon bonds? 

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Topics: fixed income, premium bond, higher coupon bond, bonds, premium bonds





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